Ship maintenance

NOC names timely vessel maintenance and sailor training as priorities during visit to Italy

Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Michael Gilday addresses Sailors during a Call to All October 18, 2019, in Naples, Italy. (Jonathan Nelson / US Navy)

Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Michael Gilday addresses Sailors during a Call to All October 18, 2019, in Naples, Italy.

Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Michael Gilday addresses Sailors during a Call to All October 18, 2019, in Naples, Italy. (Jonathan Nelson / US Navy)

Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Michael Gilday addresses Sailors during a barehanded call October 18, 2019 in Naples, Italy.

Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Michael Gilday addresses Sailors during a barehanded call October 18, 2019 in Naples, Italy. (Jonathan Nelson / US Navy)

Chief of Naval Operations Adm.  Michael Gilday discusses ways to improve the Navy on Friday, October 18, 2019, at Naval Base Naples, Italy.

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Michael Gilday discusses ways to improve the Navy on Friday, October 18, 2019, at Naval Base Naples, Italy. (Jonathan Nelson / US Navy)

NAPLES, Italy – The Navy must move ships out of maintenance docks faster and continue to improve weaponry to deal with evolving security threats around the world, the senior naval officer said on Friday.

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Michael Gilday also said in an interview with Naval Base Naples that while equipment is important, training and motivation of quality sailors is paramount.

“In the end, it’s not high tech that is going to win the fight – it will be the individual sailors,” Gilday said. “It will be that their skills, their dynamism and their passion will be better than the opponent. “

Gilday has visited naval bases in Europe and attended an international maritime conference in Venice, Italy over the past week. He travels around the world to gather information and feedback from sailors for a naval orientation plan he is writing.

When asked how the Navy comes up with high-tech weapons, such as laser cannons, hypersonic missiles, and rail guns, Gilday did not comment on specific systems, but said the Navy is making progress.

“We are quickly filling capacity gaps,” Gilday said.

China is reportedly making progress on a rail gun and Russia says it has flight tested a hypersonic cruise missile. Meanwhile, the United States plans to install a laser cannon on a destroyer by 2021.

The Navy is also looking to improve traditional weapons, Gilday said.

Modernizing cyber warfare weapons and systems is essential, as is the effective maintenance of ships, Gilday said.

Only 40% of vessels under maintenance leave the yards on time, he said, calling this unacceptable. A report by the Government Accountability Office in 2018 brought the number closer to 30%.

The Navy is working with commercial and shipyards to reduce vessel downtime, he said. This means involving the leadership of the Navy in the chain of command down to ground level supervisors, he added.

[email protected] Twitter: @wylandstripes



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